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Translational Control in Biology and Medicine

(Cold Spring Harbor Monograph Series 48)

Book Series:  Cold Spring Harbor Monograph Series
Subject Area(s):  Molecular BiologyBiochemistry

Edited by Michael B. Mathews, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey; Nahum Sonenberg, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; John W.B. Hershey, University of California, Davis

© 2007 • 934 pp., illus., index
Hardcover • $139 27.80 (click here to price in UK Pounds)
ISBN  978-087969767-9
You save: 80%

  •     Description    
  •     Contents    
  •     Reviews    
  •     Related Titles    

Description

The new edition of this successful monograph has been both updated and broadened. Since the previous (second) edition was published in 2000, the structures of the bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes have been published, advancing our basic understanding of translation and mechanisms involving protein and RNA regulators. In addition, as the title indicates, this edition has a new focus on the role of translational control in human development and disease. This book, with 30 chapters written by experts in the field, is essential reading for anyone interested in the process of translation, its regulation, and how its failure can be the cause of disease.

View two different sets of sample pages from the book here and here

Contents

1. Origins and Principles of Translational Control
M.B. Mathews, N. Sonenberg, and J.W.B. Hershey
2. Structure of the Bacterial Ribosome and Some Implications for Translational Regulation
H.F. Noller
3. Structure and Function of the Eukaryotic Ribosome and Elongation Factors
D.J. Taylor, J. Frank, and T.G. Kinzy
4. The Mechanism of Translation Initiation in Eukaryotes
T.V. Pestova, J.R. Lorsch, and C.U.T. Hellen
5. Translation Initiation by Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Sites
J.A. Doudna and P. Sarnow
6. Translation Initiation via Cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Sites
O. Elroy-Stein and W.C. Merrick
7. Translation Termination, the Prion [PSI+], and Ribosomal Recycling
M. Ehrenberg, V. Hauryliuk, C.G. Crist, and Y. Nakamura
8. Coupled Termination-Reinitiation Events in mRNA Translation
R.J. Jackson, A. Kaminski, and T.A.A. Pöyry
9. Mechanism of Translation Initiation in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae
A.G. Hinnebusch, T.E. Dever, and K. Asano
10. cis-Regulatory Sequences and trans-Acting Factors in Translational Control
M.W. Hentze, F. Gebauer, and T. Preiss
11. Regulation of mRNA Molecules by MicroRNAs
K.A. Wehner and P. Sarnow
12. The eIF2α Kinases
T.E. Dever, A.C. Dar and F. Sicheri
13. eIF2α Phosphorylation in Cellular Stress Responses and Disease
D. Ron and H.P. Harding
14. Signaling to Translation Initiation
B. Raught and A.-C. Gingras
15. Translational Control in Cancer Development and Progression
R.J. Schneider and N. Sonenberg
16. Matters of Life and Death: Translation Initiation during Apoptosis
S.J. Morley and M.J. Coldwell
17. Translational Control in Metabolic Diseases: The Role of mTOR Signaling in Obesity and Diabetes
S.C. Kozma, S.H. Um, and G. Thomas
18. Translational Control of Synaptic Plasticity and Learning and Memory
E. Klann and J.D. Richter
19. Translational Control in Development
B. Thompson, M. Wickens, and J. Kimble
20. Protein Synthesis and Translational Control during Viral Infection
I.J. Mohr, T. Pe'ery, and M.B. Mathews
21. Regulation of Translation Elongation and the Cotranslational Protein Targeting Pathway
T.P. Herbert and C.G. Proud
22. Regulation of Termination and Recoding
J.D. Dinman and M.J. Berry
23. Nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay: From Yeast to Metazoans
A. Jacobson and E. Izaurralde
24. Localized Translation through Messenger RNA Localization
E.R. Gavis, R.H. Singer, and S. Hüttelmaier
25. The Interface between mRNA Turnover and Translational Control
C.I. Gonzales C.J. Wilusz, and J. Wilusz
26. Translational Control in Plants and Chloroplasts
D.R. Gallie
27. Mitochondrial Translation and Human Disease
E.A. Shoubridge and F. Sasarman
28. Translational Control in Prokaryotes
P. Romby and M. Springer
29. Noncanonical Functions of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Translational Control
P.L. Fox, P.S. Ray, A. Arif, and J. Jia
30. Therapeutic Opportunities in Translation
J. Pelletier and S.W. Peltz
Index

Reviews

review:  “This is a very useful volume for all those who know or suspect that transcriptional control of their favourite gene may not be the complete story.”
      —Society for General Microbiology Quarterly

review:  “The editors are to be congratulated on assembling an outstanding collection of contributions and contributors. While which chapters you choose to read will undoubtedly reflect your specific interests, I would encourage all to read the opening chapter written by the editors where they provide a highly readable review of the origins, mechanisms and targets of translational control and in so doing provide an important historical context for readers new to this ‘hot’ topic.

Even if you already have the previous edition of Translational Control (as I do), then that should not inhibit you from buying this new edition; it is not just an updated version of the previous editions. The editors have introduced a significant number of new topics, some of which (for example, microRNAs) were not yet on the radar in 2000. Where topics have been covered in the previous edition(s), they have succeeded in their stated aim of getting chapters that are ‘stimulating, edifying and authoritative’ and in several cases have used different authors to ‘ring the changes’.”
      —Genetical Research

review:  “Sequels often suffer from several shortcomings, including the monotonous repetition of ideas and the absence of the most recent advances. Readers of previous versions might have expected only a modestly updated and expanded version this time. But they are in for a surprise: all of the chapters are either substantially rewritten or are completely new and contributed by new authors. This guarantees that the book is up to date and offers fresh ideas on the future of translation research. Given the scope of this book, even the editors themselves warn that few ‘will choose to read this volume from cover to cover, and certainly not in sequence.’ I did, and I am glad. This book should not be missing from the shelves of any scholars of translation.”
      —Nature Cell Biology

review:  “The new edition has been both updated and broadened. Since the previous (second) edition was published in 2000, the structures of the bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes have been published, advancing our basic understanding of translation and mechanisms involving protein and RNA regulators. In addition, as the title indicates, this edition has a new focus on the role of translational control in human development and disease. Each reader will find out his own loved chapter... but all 30 chapters are an essential reading for anyone interested in the process of translation, its regulation, and how its failure can be the cause of disease.”
      —European Journal of Histochemistry