` Immune Memory and Vaccines: Great Debates
   

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Immune Memory and Vaccines: Great Debates


Book Series:  A Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology Collection
Subject Area(s):  Immunology and Vaccines

Edited by Shane Crotty, La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology; Rafi Ahmed, Emory University School of Medicine

Due January 2018 • 300 pages (approx.), illustrated, index
Hardcover • $135 94.50 (click here to price in UK Pounds)
ISBN  978-1-621821-54-0
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Description

After an initial encounter with a pathogen, the adaptive immune system creates immune cells that remember the antigens on the pathogen and allow the body to rapidly mount a response during future encounters. Vaccines likewise generate immune memory, preventing the body from succumbing to potentially dangerous infections. Understanding the mechanistic basis of immune memory is therefore essential for designing effective vaccines.

Written and edited by experts in the field, this collection from Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology focuses on the critical questions currently debated in the field of immune memory and vaccination. Topics include the plasticity of memory CD4 T cells, the formation of germinal centers by memory B cells, the contributions of natural killer cells to immune memory, and the influence of commensal microbiota on immune responses. Several contributors respond to each question, providing a variety of fresh, concise perspectives on each topic.

Additional questions address the development and effectiveness of vaccines to various pathogens (e.g., dengue virus and Bordatella pertussis), as well as efforts to develop vaccines against cancer. This volume is therefore valuable for all immunologists, cell biologists, and medical scientists wishing to understand immunological memory, vaccines, and the implications for human health and disease.